#tbt

Dusty Gems and Forgotten Failures

Take a walk through our individual and collective creative past. We’ll unearth a few design memories that make us feel warm and fuzzy, as well as some work that never saw the light of day.

Baby Fingers is an alternate illustration (that creeps out the entire studio) we proposed for an article that appeared in The New York Times on optimism.
You can see the illustration that was published here.


“Look at those chicken feet. They look pretty real, don’t they? Well in 2010 when I was living with Johnny in San Francisco, I came home from work and opened my freezer only to find myself face-to-foot with a pair of disembodied chicken tootsies. Naturally I had questions. As it turns out, Johnny had bought the offending feet at a local market and was dipping them in ink to get some EXTREMELY authentic prints to use while constructing this Roosterwalk poster. The freezer was serving as a temporary morgue so that the feet would stay “fresh”, which is just lovely. So enjoy the poster folks, but beware a Selman’s freezer and what may be on the other side.”

– Christopher


For three years running we’ve tried to get animals included on NYC DOT’s Barrier Beautification project under the motifs “Concrete Jungle” and “Ba-ba-barrier”. Each year our proposal has been summarily rejected. Come on folks, you know you want to see these critters in your hood!


We saw the trailer for Deepwater Horizon recently and it reminded us of a piece we did about the disaster back in 2010 when it occurred.


Trumpers is an alternate illustration we proposed for an article that appeared in The New York Times recently on Donald Trump’s birther nonsense.
You can see the illustration that was published here.


Environmental advocacy. Since 1994.


The VR Eagle is an alternate illustration we proposed for an article that appeared in The New York Times on presidential campaigns serving as a simulation and stress test for the job itself.

You can see the illustration that was published here.


“GIF Horse”, as it’s affectionately called around the studio, is a small byproduct of a project we worked on that was never made public. May you forever run into the sunset noble stallion!


From 2007: Johnny’s hand drawn portrait of The Flaming Lips comprised of illustrated references to over 50 songs spanning the band’s career. The portrait was then turned into a limited run of screen prints. The featured print found it’s way backstage prior to the band’s performance at Bonnaroo where the Lips were gracious enough to sign a personalized copy.